A Honey of a Day

Honey Gifts for Everyone

Honey Gifts for Everyone

It was a day of sweetness and friends. A bee-utiful education combined with ice cream sundaes and honey. The opportunity to learn more about the environment we live in.

Jim (my husband) and Michelene (my daughter) officially launched their bee business last evening. They hosted their first Honey Party as “Beefuddled Farms,” a name Jim chose a few years ago when he entertained the idea of creating a business out of his hobby.

Michelene Share Her Bee Knowledge

Michelene Shares Her Bee Knowledge

Michelene joined Jim in his bee business almost from the beginning. They learned together what it takes to make a hive from frames and bees. The hard lessons, like losing bees over a very cold winter, have also been part of the education. They have perservered. Two years ago they had to replace almost every hive they had but they did it. They used their experience to manifest a greater success for their bees.

There was finally enough surplus honey to host this bee party. Everyone paid a small admission to come and the reward was a Beefuddled Farms honey sample. There was also ice cream sundaes with teddy graham cookies and honey. In celebration of this event I made homemade lotion from extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, our own beeswax and lavender oil. I sold nearly every jar.

Some Serious Spinning!

Some Serious Spinning!

I have to say I learned a few things I didn’t know about bees. If you spray your lawn with pesticides, you are not helping the bees (how did I not realize this?). Planting bee friendly flowers and even a vegetable garden gives the bees something to pollinate. I know this for a fact. The flowers in our yard and the vegetables in our garden are lush and healthy.

You have to follow your own local ordinaces if you’re thinking of having bees. If you can’t have them where you live, consider purchasing honey from your local farmer’s market. There is a big difference in taste from supermarket honey to local raw honey. Not only does it taste better, but you are giving yourself immunities to local pollen. Just remember, no raw honey for children under two years of age.

There should be a Beefuddled website up soon. For now, follow Jim and Michelene on their honey adventures on Instagram at @BeefuddledFarms. If you’re on Facebook they’re at Facebook.com/BeefuddledFarms.

Thank You for the Beautiful Weather

Thank You for the Beautiful Weather!

 

Jim Scrapes the Frames. The Screened In Area Kept Bees at Bay

Jim Scrapes the Frames. The Screened In Area Kept Bees at Bay.

 

Scraping the Comb. Photo by Kris Hughes

Scraping the Comb. Photo by Kris Hughes.

 

The Sweet Honey. Photo by Kris Hughes.

The Sweet Honey. Photo by Kris Hughes.

 

After the Scraping, This is the Honeycomb. Jim Melts this into Beeswax.

After the Scraping, This is the Honeycomb. Jim Melts this into Beeswax.

 

Lotion on the Left, Extra Honey in the Middle, Gifts on the Right.

Lotion on the Left, Extra Honey in the Middle, Gifts on the Right.

“The keeping of bees is like the direction of sunbeams.”
Henry David Thoreau

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17 thoughts on “A Honey of a Day

  1. Cathy McElhaney

    How cool! I would be too afraid of getting stung! I am not a fan of bee’s… I love the name Beefuddled Farms! I wish Jim and Michelene much success!
    Thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  2. Michelene

    I had so much fun with everyone! Thank you for the bee-utiful post and kind words. It still doesn’t cease to amaze me that people are as fascinated with the bees as we are. We are so blessed by to family, friends, and beautiful weather!

    Reply
  3. Cindy

    How awesome!! These pictures are great! What an educational experience for kids and adults as well, and fun!!! We just all worry about getting stung(esp kids) , and don’t even realize or understand how we get something so healthy and delicious from a bee that stings us!!! I am amused looking at these pictures!! I would love to bring my grandkids to the next one!! This is sure to be a “honey” of a business!!!

    Reply
    1. Joanne Cain Post author

      Not one person got stung at the person. There were only a few curious bees around. Jim and Michelene did a good job of that.
      The next one is Sept. 12. Let me know if you want to come and I’ll reserve you a spot.
      Joanne xoxo

      Reply
    1. Joanne Cain Post author

      I thought about the eggs part before the party. We have nine chickens that produce about 12-16 eggs a week (depending on the weather, etc). That’s enough for our consumption and a few for friends.
      Jim and Michelene have been planning this for a couple of years. I know they will love this whole process, meeting people and teaching them about bees. Thank you for your wishes!

      Reply
  4. Marianne

    Wow! That’s amazing, Joanne. Congratulations to your husband and daughter on their accomplishments. I immediately thought about an Australian father and son bee keeper team who invented The Flow Hive. It’s a way for beekeepers to harvest the honey without disturbing the bees. The hives are in the ‘box’ and you simply turn on the spout and the honey pours out. You can read about it if you’re interested.

    Thank you for sharing this wonderful success story. Always happy to hear those.

    As you may know I am in the process of moving – to where is anyone’s guess at this moment. There have been some glitches,but I’m making the best to stay in faith…not easy, I’m afraid. So my blogging and/or catching up with others’ blogs may wane a bit…I can’t tell at the moment.

    Blessings for more things to celebrate,
    Marianne

    Reply
    1. Joanne Cain Post author

      I know you are moving. I’m praying for you. I have a feeling you will find a place where you will be very happy! Keeping you in my thoughts and prayers. xoxo Joanne

      Reply
  5. Marylin Warner

    Joanne, this is a fascinating and inspiring post about a true honey of a day. I love the “Bee-fuddled Farm” logo, and having a father/daughter team working together is wonderful. Our doctor’s phy. asst. began buying only honey in her area, saying it was not just delicious, but had also helped some of their allergies.
    Since we live in the same area, we began buying from the same bee keeper for ourselves and our 84-year-old neighbor, and he swears his asthma and overall health have improved. Bees are such an essential link in the survival chain, and you and your husband and daughter are doing important work! Blessings on you all.

    Reply
    1. Joanne Cain Post author

      Hi Marylin, Jim tells everyone he originally began his bee hobby to help our grandson’s allergies. I believe the honey has helped and Gavin has done much better. I love the honey myself and have grown so spoiled with having delicious honey all the time. I love it best in the winter in tea, with milk. YUM. Blessings to you. xo

      Reply

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